Valve Basics

Valve Basics

A valve is a device that regulates, directs or controls the flow of a fluid (gases, liquids, fluidized solids, or slurries) by opening, closing, or partially obstructing various passageways.

When selecting your valve consider the following:

  1. Choose a valve type depending on your application.
  2. Consider your fluid type (liquid or gas) and its characteristics to determine compatible valve materials
  3. Determine the temperature, pressure, and flow rate under which your valve will be operating.
  4. Consider your maintenance requirements.

Valve Types

Angle-Seat Valves:

An angle seat piston valveis a pneumatically-controlled valve with a piston actuator providing linear actuation to lift a seal off its seat. The seat is set at an angle to provide the

Ares Angle Seat Valve

Ares Angle Seat Valve

maximum possible flow when unseated. Angle seat piston valves are particularly suited to applications where high temperatures and large flow rates are required, such as steam or water.

Ball Valves:

Designed primarily for on/off service a ball valve is a valve with a spherical disc, the part of the valve which controls the flow through it. The sphere has a hole, or port, through the middle so that when the port is in line with both ends of the valve, flow will occur. When the valve is closed, the hole is perpendicular to the ends of the valve, and flow is blocked. A handle or electric actuator rotates the ball 90°, turning the flow on or off.

Butterfly Valves:

A butterfly valve is a valve which can be used for isolating or regulating flow. The closing mechanism takes the form of a disk. Operation is similar to that of a ball valve, which allows for quick shut off. Butterfly valves are generally favored because they are lower in cost to other valve designs as well as being lighter in weight, meaning less support is required. The disc is positioned in the center of the pipe, passing through the disc is a rod connected to an actuator on the outside of the valve. Rotating the actuator turns the disc either parallel or perpendicular to the flow. Unlike a ball valve, the disc is always present within the flow, therefore a pressure drop is always induced in the flow, regardless of valve position.

Check Valves:

A check valve or one-way valve is a mechanical device, a valve, which normally allows fluid to flow through it in only one direction. Check valves are two-port valves, meaning they have two openings in the body, one for fluid to enter and the other for fluid to leave. There are various types of check valves used in a wide variety of applications.

Diaphragm  Valves:

Diaphragm valves (or membrane valves) consists of a valve body with two or more ports, a diaphragm, and a “saddle” or seat upon which the diaphragm closes the valve. The valve is constructed from either plastic or steel.

Needle Valve:

A needle valve is a type of valve having a small port and a threaded, needle-shaped plunger. It allows precise regulation of flow, although it is generally only capable of relatively low flow rates.

Plug  Valves:

Plug valves are valves with cylindrical or conically-tapered “plugs” which can be rotated inside the valve body to control flow through the valve. The plugs in plug valves have one or more hollow passageways going sideways through the plug, so that fluid can flow through the plug when the valve is open. Plug valves are simple and often economical.

Poppet  Valves:

A poppet valve is a valve typically used to control the timing and quantity of gas or vapour flow into an engine. It consists of a hole, usually round or oval, and a tapered plug, usually a disk shape on the end of a shaft also called a valve stem. The shaft guides the plug portion by sliding through a valve guide.

Solenoid Valves :

A solenoid valve is an electromechanically operated valve. The valve is controlled by an electric current through a solenoid: in the case of a two-port solenoid valve the flow is switched on or off; in the case of a three-port valve, the outflow is switched between the two outlet ports. Multiple solenoid valves can be placed together on a manifold.

 

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About Kim O'Neill

Marketing administrator at Assured Automation, a leading provider of automated valves and flow components for industrial process control applications. For over 30 years Assured Automation has provided state of the art automation to a diverse clientele ranging from small equipment manufacturers to Fortune 500 Manufacturing, Chemical and Pharmaceutical companies. The Assured Automation product line consists of a complete offering of standardized automated valve assemblies with a variety of commonly used accessory items. In addition, we offer complete valve automation services where we supply special automated valve assemblies designed around your specified products or your particular applications. Full design capabilities are offered including AutoCAD, Solidworks or other commonly used design and drawing programs. In addition to standard products, Assured Automation develops customized solutions for specific customer challenges. You can find Kim O'Neill on Google+ and LinkedIn.
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